The jobs list for my Kayak has been growing steadily over recent weeks. Lots of little bits needed tweaking or fixing. Nothing major but a couple with the potential to grow into more significant issues. I managed to grab a couple of hours this week to give the boat some much needed TLC.

Seat Unit Removed

Seat Unit Removed

One job I’d been meaning to do for a while was remove the seat and check it over as well as clean thoroughly underneath. Grit and small pebbles have a habit of hiding away under the seat and then begin a process of attrition which can wear through the hull over an extended period of time, popping a small but troublesome hole in the boat.

Flushing the boat out after every paddle goes a long way to preventing this however it is possible for pebbles to embed themselves into the foam padding found under some seats and prevent them from being washed out. This proved to be the case on my seat and I found several small stones stuck into the underside of the seat.

Dents Left By Embedded Stones

Dents Left By Embedded Stones

To remove the seat from my own boat (P&H Cetus) there are two bolts – one on each side of the boat which run through the deck, seat and then into two largish plates with a bolt attached. These act as ‘oversized’ washers under the seat spreading the load from the tightened bolt across a larger area of the seat. Removal is as simple as unscrewing the bolt and then having the patience to carefully twist and turn the seat unit until it can be lifted out of the cockpit – a little pressure to bend the sidewalls is needed as it is a snug fit.

With the seat out it is possible to remove the stones and check the inside of the hull carefully for any signs or wear or damage. Luckily there was no major damage so far. I also checked the various bolts and washers on the seat and backrest unit as well as the attachment loops that are built into the back of the seat.

Empty Cockpit

Empty Cockpit

It is also an ideal time to make use of the increased access to the cockpit to check over the footrests, bulkheads and skeg components as well as give the boat a really good clean, and boy did mine need one!

Replacing the seat is a little bit fiddly, particularly ensuring the small washer is seated neatly when the main bolts are replaced to stop water ingress as well as ensuring the spreaders at the back of the seat are not positioned in a way that will let them rub against the hull.

Bolt And Spreader

Bolt And Spreader

A worth while 30 minutes which could pay dividends down the road.